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Amgen’s Kyprolis Significantly Improved Overall Survival Compared to Velcade in Head-to-Head Trial in Multiple Myeloma

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced positive results from a planned overall survival (OS) interim analysis of the Phase 3 head-to-head ENDEAVOR trial. The study met the key secondary endpoint of OS, demonstrating that patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma treated with KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib) and dexamethasone (Kd) lived 7.6 months longer than those treated with Velcade®(bortezomib) and dexamethasone (Vd) (median OS 47.6 months for Kd versus 40.0 for Vd, HR = 0.79, 95 percent CI, 0.65 – 0.96). This Kd regimen administered with 56 mg/m2 KYPROLIS twice weekly is already approved in the U.S., European Union and other countries based on the primary analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) in the ENDEAVOR study.

“For an incurable disease like multiple myeloma, a major treatment goal for oncologists and hematologists is to help patients live as long as possible,” said study co-author and investigator Meletios  A. Dimopoulos, M.D., professor of Clinical Therapeutics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine. “Based on these data, we now know that KYPROLIS not only significantly extended progression-free survival compared to Velcade, but also overall survival, making it a clinically meaningful advance in the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.”

“These results confirm the superiority of KYPROLIS over Velcade in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients,” said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. “A survival benefit has rarely been demonstrated in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. ENDEAVOR is the only study to demonstrate a survival benefit in a head-to-head comparison with a current standard of care regimen. These results further support KYPROLIS as a foundational therapy in this patient population.”

Adverse events observed in this updated analysis were consistent with those previously reported for ENDEAVOR. The most common adverse events (greater than or equal to 20 percent) in the KYPROLIS arm were anemia, diarrhea, pyrexia, dyspnea, fatigue, hypertension, cough, insomnia, upper respiratory tract infection, peripheral edema, nausea, bronchitis, asthenia, back pain, thrombocytopenia and headache.

Detailed results will be presented on Saturday, March 4 at 7:30 a.m. IST at the 16th International Myeloma Workshop in New Delhi. Amgen plans to submit these results to regulatory agencies worldwide to support a potential label update to the ENDEAVOR study results.

The KYPROLIS clinical program continues to focus on providing solutions for physicians and patients in treating this frequently relapsing and difficult-to-treat cancer. KYPROLIS is available for patients whose myeloma has relapsed or become resistant to another treatment and continues to be studied in a range of combinations and patient populations.

About ENDEAVOR
The randomized ENDEAVOR (RandomizEd, OpeN Label, Phase 3 Study of Carfilzomib Plus DExamethAsone Vs Bortezomib Plus DexamethasOne in Patients With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma) trial of 929 patients evaluated KYPROLIS in combination with low-dose dexamethasone (Kd), versus bortezomib with low-dose dexamethasone (Vd) in patients whose multiple myeloma has relapsed after at least one, but not more than three prior therapeutic regimens. The primary endpoint of the trial was PFS, defined as the time from treatment initiation to disease progression or death. The primary analysis was published in The Lancet Oncology and is described in the Prescribing Information.

Patients received treatment until progression with KYPROLIS as a 30-minute infusion on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16 of 28 day treatment cycles, along with low-dose dexamethasone (20 mg). For Cycle 1 only, KYPROLIS was administered at 20 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2, and if tolerated was escalated to 56 mg/m2 from day 8 Cycle 1 onwards. Patients who received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2) with low-dose dexamethasone (20 mg) were treated with bortezomib administered subcutaneously or intravenously at the discretion of the investigator and in accordance with regional regulatory approval of bortezomib. More than 75 percent of the patients in the control arm received bortezomib subcutaneously. This study was conducted at 235 sites worldwide. For information about this trial, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov under trial identification number NCT01568866 or the News Release section of Amgen.com.

About Multiple Myeloma
Multiple myeloma is an incurable blood cancer, characterized by a recurring pattern of remission and relapse.1 It is a rare and very aggressive disease that accounts for approximately one percent of all cancers.2,3 In the U.S., there are nearly 95,000 people living with, or in remission from, multiple myeloma.4 Approximately 30,330 Americans are diagnosed with multiple myeloma each year and 12,650 patient deaths are reported on an annual basis.4

About KYPROLIS® (carfilzomib)
Proteasomes play an important role in cell function and growth by breaking down proteins that are damaged or no longer needed.5 KYPROLIS has been shown to block proteasomes, leading to an excessive build-up of proteins within cells.5 In some cells, KYPROLIS can cause cell death, especially in myeloma cells because they are more likely to contain a higher amount of abnormal proteins.5,6

KYPROLIS is approved in the U.S. for the following:

  • In combination with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three lines of therapy.
  • As a single agent for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one or more lines of therapy.

KYPROLIS is also approved in Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Hong Kong, Israel, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Macao, Mexico, Thailand, Colombia, S. Korea, Canada, Qatar, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Russia, Brazil, India and the European Union. Additional regulatory applications for KYPROLIS are underway and have been submitted to health authorities worldwide.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Cardiac Toxicities

  • New onset or worsening of pre-existing cardiac failure (e.g., congestive heart failure, pulmonary edema, decreased ejection fraction), restrictive cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia, and myocardial infarction including fatalities have occurred following administration of KYPROLIS. Some events occurred in patients with normal baseline ventricular function. Death due to cardiac arrest has occurred within one day of KYPROLIS administration.
  • Monitor patients for clinical signs or symptoms of cardiac failure or cardiac ischemia. Evaluate promptly if cardiac toxicity is suspected. Withhold KYPROLIS for Grade 3 or 4 cardiac adverse events until recovery, and consider whether to restart KYPROLIS at 1 dose level reduction based on a benefit/risk assessment.
  • While adequate hydration is required prior to each dose in Cycle 1, monitor all patients for evidence of volume overload, especially patients at risk for cardiac failure. Adjust total fluid intake as clinically appropriate in patients with baseline cardiac failure or who are at risk for cardiac failure.
  • Patients ≥ 75 years, the risk of cardiac failure is increased. Patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV heart failure, recent myocardial infarction, conduction abnormalities, angina, or arrhythmias may be at greater risk for cardiac complications and should have a comprehensive medical assessment (including blood pressure and fluid management) prior to starting treatment with KYPROLIS and remain under close follow-up.

Acute Renal Failure

  • Cases of acute renal failure and renal insufficiency adverse events (including renal failure) have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Acute renal failure was reported more frequently in patients with advanced relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma who received KYPROLIS monotherapy. Monitor renal function with regular measurement of the serum creatinine and/or estimated creatinine clearance. Reduce or withhold dose as appropriate.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome

  • Cases of Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS), including fatal outcomes, have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Patients with multiple myeloma and a high tumor burden should be considered at greater risk for TLS. Adequate hydration is required prior to each dose in Cycle 1, and in subsequent cycles as needed. Consider uric acid lowering drugs in patients at risk for TLS. Monitor for evidence of TLS during treatment and manage promptly. Withhold KYPROLIS until TLS is resolved.

Pulmonary Toxicity

  • Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), acute respiratory failure, and acute diffuse infiltrative pulmonary disease such as pneumonitis and interstitial lung disease have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Some events have been fatal. In the event of drug-induced pulmonary toxicity, discontinue KYPROLIS.

Pulmonary Hypertension

  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was reported in patients treated with KYPROLIS. Evaluate with cardiac imaging and/or other tests as indicated. Withhold KYPROLIS for PAH until resolved or returned to baseline and consider whether to restart KYPROLIS based on a benefit/risk assessment.

Dyspnea

  • Dyspnea was reported in patients treated with KYPROLIS. Evaluate dyspnea to exclude cardiopulmonary conditions including cardiac failure and pulmonary syndromes. Stop KYPROLIS for Grade 3 or 4 dyspnea until resolved or returned to baseline. Consider whether to restart KYPROLIS based on a benefit/risk assessment.

Hypertension

  • Hypertension, including hypertensive crisis and hypertensive emergency, has been observed with KYPROLIS. Some of these events have been fatal. Monitor blood pressure regularly in all patients. If hypertension cannot be adequately controlled, withhold KYPROLIS and evaluate. Consider whether to restart KYPROLIS based on a benefit/risk assessment.

Venous Thrombosis

  • Venous thromboembolic events (including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) have been observed with KYPROLIS. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended for patients being treated with the combination of KYPROLIS with dexamethasone or with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone. The thromboprophylaxis regimen should be based on an assessment of the patient’s underlying risks.
  • Patients using oral contraceptives or a hormonal method of contraception associated with a risk of thrombosis should consider an alternative method of effective contraception during treatment with KYPROLIS in combination with dexamethasone or lenalidomide plus dexamethasone.

Infusion Reactions

  • Infusion reactions, including life-threatening reactions, have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS.
  • Symptoms include fever, chills, arthralgia, myalgia, facial flushing, facial edema, vomiting, weakness, shortness of breath, hypotension, syncope, chest tightness, or angina. These reactions can occur immediately following or up to 24 hours after administration of KYPROLIS. Premedicate with dexamethasone to reduce the incidence and severity of infusion reactions. Inform patients of the risk and of symptoms of an infusion reaction and to contact a physician immediately if they occur.

Hemorrhage

  • Fatal or serious cases of hemorrhage have been reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Hemorrhagic events have included gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and intracranial hemorrhage and epistaxis. Promptly evaluate signs and symptoms of blood loss. Reduce or withhold dose as appropriate.

Thrombocytopenia

  • KYPROLIS causes thrombocytopenia with recovery to baseline platelet count usually by the start of the next cycle. Thrombocytopenia was reported in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Monitor platelet counts frequently during treatment with KYPROLIS. Reduce or withhold dose as appropriate.

Hepatic Toxicity and Hepatic Failure

  • Cases of hepatic failure, including fatal cases, have been reported during treatment with KYPROLIS. KYPROLIS can cause increased serum transaminases. Monitor liver enzymes regularly regardless of baseline values. Reduce or withhold dose as appropriate.

Thrombotic Microangiopathy

  • Cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS), including fatal outcome have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS. Monitor for signs and symptoms of TTP/HUS. Discontinue KYPROLIS if diagnosis is suspected. If the diagnosis of TTP/HUS is excluded, KYPROLIS may be restarted. The safety of reinitiating KYPROLIS therapy in patients previously experiencing TTP/HUS is not known.

Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES)

  • Cases of PRES have occurred in patients receiving KYPROLIS. PRES was formerly known as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome. Consider a neuro-radiological imaging (MRI) for onset of visual or neurological symptoms. Discontinue KYPROLIS if PRES is suspected and evaluate. The safety of reinitiating KYPROLIS therapy in patients previously experiencing PRES is not known.

Embryo-fetal Toxicity

  • KYPROLIS can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals.
  • Females of reproductive potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while being treated with KYPROLIS. Males of reproductive potential should be advised to avoid fathering a child while being treated with KYPROLIS. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if pregnancy occurs while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • The most common adverse reactions occurring in at least 20% of patients treated with KYPROLIS in the combination therapy trials: anemia, neutropenia, diarrhea, dyspnea, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, pyrexia, insomnia, muscle spasm, cough, upper respiratory tract infection, hypokalemia.
  • The most common adverse reactions occurring in at least 20% of patients treated with KYPROLIS in monotherapy trials: anemia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, nausea, pyrexia, dyspnea, diarrhea, headache, cough, edema peripheral.

Please see full prescribing information at www.kyprolis.com.

About Amgen’s Commitment to Oncology
Amgen Oncology is committed to helping patients take on some of the toughest cancers, such as those that have been resistant to drugs, those that progress rapidly through the body and those where limited treatment options exist. Amgen’s supportive care treatments help patients combat certain side effects of strong chemotherapy, and our targeted medicines and immunotherapies focus on more than a dozen different malignancies, ranging from blood cancers to solid tumors. With decades of experience providing therapies for cancer patients, Amgen continues to grow its portfolio of innovative and biosimilar oncology medicines.

About Amgen
Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and understand the fundamentals of human biology.

Amgen focuses on areas of high unmet medical need and leverages its expertise to strive for solutions that improve health outcomes and dramatically improve people’s lives. A biotechnology pioneer since 1980, Amgen has grown to be one of the world’s leading independent biotechnology companies, has reached millions of patients around the world and is developing a pipeline of medicines with breakaway potential.

For more information, visit www.amgen.com and follow us on www.twitter.com/amgen.

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